European Results: UCL, Europa Lge Qualfying

The UEFA Champions League is under way with the opening qualifiers. Welsh champions The New Saints came past Havnar Bóltfelag with a 2-0 win in the Faroe Islands followed by a 1-1 draw back in Oswestry. In the other match, Jeunesse d’Esch won both legs 2-0 against Marsaxloxx of Malta. The next round will be played 18 and 25 July.

UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
 Second Qualifying Phase (Champions)

  KAZ      Shakhter Karagandy  -  Omonoia Nicosia        CYP
  SVN                  Gorica  -  Hapoel Tel-Aviv        ISR
  SWE                     AIK  -  Wisla Krakow           POL
  HUN                Videoton  -  Buducnost              MNE
  ARM                    Mika  -  Partizan Belgrade      SRB
  NIR                Glenavon  -  Sheriff Tiraspol       MDA
  BLR            BATE Borisov  -  Jeunesse Esch          LUX
  LVA               Metalurgs  -  Red Bull Salzburg      AUT
  SVK                  Zilina  -  Neftçi                 AZE
  BIH             Zeljeznicar  -  The New Saints         WAL
  SMR               Tre Penne  -  Helsingin JK           FIN
  AND              FC Andorra  -  Diamo Tblisi           GEO
  IRL         Shamrock Rovers  -  Renova                 MKD
  SUI                   Basel  -  F.Hafnarfjörður        ISL
  ALB                   Teuta  -  CSKA Sofia             BUL
  LTU                 Ekranas  -  FC København           DEN
  EST                   Flora  -  Molde                  NOR

Hoffenheim were the big winners in the opening qualifying round of the UEFA Europa League with a comfortable 13-0 aggregate victory over Welsh side Llanelli. St Mirren also beat Racing by the same scoreline, winning 8-0 in Scotland before a more retrained 5-0 win in Luxembourg.

The next qualifying round takes place 19 and 26 July.

UEFA EUROPA LEAGUE
 Second Qualifying Round

   MKD              Rabotnick  -  APOEL Nicosia          CYP
   BIH       Olimpic Sarajevo  -  Luzern                 SUI
   CRO          Slaven Belupo  -  Trnava                 SVK
   DEN            Midtjylland  -  Skonto Riga            LVA
   POL           Legia Warsaw  -  I.Akraness             ISL
   POR              Guimarães  -  Derry City             IRL
   SVN               Olimpija  -  Vardar Skopje          MKD
   ISL         KR Reykjavíkur  -  Rangers                SCO
   BLR                  Brest  -  Esbjerg                DEN
   FIN               FC Inter  -  Atromitos              GRE
   NIR               Linfield  -  Györ                   HUN
   MNE         Rudar Pljevlja  -  Beitar Jerusalem       ISR
   HUN               Debrecen  -  Shkendija              MKD
   AUT           Rapid Vienna  -  FK Sarajevo            BIH
   CYP              Paralimni  -  St Mirren              SCO
   GER             Hoffenheim  -  SV Ried                AUT
   ISR       Maccabi Tel-Aviv  -  Hammarby               SWE
   NOR                 Tromsø  -  Karpaty                UKR
   AUT         Austria Vienna  -  Zestaponi              GEO
   POL            Lech Poznan  -  Mogren Budva           MNE
   POL                  Slask  -  Levadia                EST
   BUL        Lokomotiv Sofia  -  Rapid Bucharest        ROU
   LVA              Ventspils  -  Lillestrøm             NOR
   NOR              Rosenborg  -  Jagodina               SRB
   BLR     Shakhter Soligorsk  -  Honka                  FIN
   CRO              Dugopolje  -  Mura 05                SVN
   NIR           Cliftonville  -  Dundee United          SCO
   SUI                 Zürich  -  KF Tirana              ALB
   AZE                  Xäzär  -  Anorthosi              CYP
   LIE                  Vaduz  -  Qarabag Agdam          AZE
   FIN                   KuPS  -  Feyenoord              NED
   GEO              Dila Gori  -  Red Star Belgrade      SRB
   BLR                  Minsk  -  Bursaspor              TUR
   IRL           Sligo Rovers  -  Suduva Marijampole     LTU
   BEL         Standard Liege  -  Häcken                 SWE
   CZE         Slovan Liberec  -  Djurgården             SWE
   BUL                   Litex -  Dacia Chisinau         MDA
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UEFA Announce 2022 Finals: Moscow, Munich

UEFA have today announced the venues for the finals of the 2002 Champions League and Europa League. Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium, which will hold this summer’s World Cup Final next weekend, will host the Champions League Final for the first time since the 2008 dour draw between Manchester United and Chelsea.

Munich’s Allianz-Arena will hold its second-ever continental cup final when the Europa League visits in 2022. The ground previously hosted Chelsea’s 2012 Champions League win over Bayern Munich in their own ground.

Millennium Stadium (Cardiff), Estádio da Luz (Lisbon), Atatürk (Istanbul), Hampden Park (Glasgow), Etihad Stadium (Manchester), and the Ernst-Happel Stadioum (Vienna) were the other six stadia across Europe who submitted bids to host either Final.

Champions League Set To Kick-Off Next Week

UEFA have made the draw for the opening qualifying rounds of the Champions League. This initial stage features the 36 champions of the lowest-seeded nations, and is four rounds away from the hallowed Group Stage. Ties are set to take place 04 and 11 July for the four First Round sides, with the seventeen Second Round ties on 18 and 25 July.

The 2019 Final will be played at the Olympic Stadium, Athens on 01 July.

UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
 First Qualifying Phase (Champions)
  
  FRO        Havnar Bóltfelag  -  The New Saints         WAL
  LUX           Jeunesse Esch  -  Marsaxlokk             MLT

 Second Qualifying Phase (Champions)

  KAZ      Shakhter Karagandy  -  Omonoia Nicosia        CYP
  SVN                  Gorica  -  Hapoel Tel-Aviv        ISR
  SWE                     AIK  -  Wisla Krakow           POL
  HUN                Videoton  -  Buducnost              MNE
  ARM                    Mika  -  Partizan Belgrade      SRB
  NIR                Glenavon  -  Sheriff Tiraspol       MDA
  BLR            BATE Borisov  -  Jeunesse Esch / Marsaxlokk
  LVA               Metalurgs  -  Red Bull Salzburg      AUT
  SVK                  Zilina  -  Neftçi                 AZE
  BIH             Zeljeznicar  -  Havnar Bóltf. / New Saints
  SMR               Tre Penne  -  Helsingin JK           FIN
  AND              FC Andorra  -  Diamo Tblisi           GEO
  IRL         Shamrock Rovers  -  Renova                 MKD
  SUI                   Basel  -  F.Hafnarfjörður        ISL
  ALB                   Teuta  -  CSKA Sofia             BUL
  LTU                 Ekranas  -  FC København           DEN
  EST                   Flora  -  Molde                  NOR

Catch-Up: U Is For… UEFA (Clubs & Cups)

The end is in sight! We’re up to part fifteen of our blast through three simulated seasons that bring us right up-to-date on the eve of the 2018 FIFA World Cup that starts this week! With just three to go, we’re up to ‘U’ which means a look at the UEFA rankings and a full list of continental cup final results.

Coefficients in the graphic below show the top 50 European club sides and the seedings that applied for the 2017-18 season in which Chelsea won the Champions League and Arsenal lifted the Europa League. The top ten has been calculated for 2018-19 and reproduced below. Note that these affect seedings for continental competition.

UEFA COEFFICIENTS FOR 2018-19:
  1. Chelsea             161.434
  2. Barcelona           158.799
  3. Manchester United   158.434
  4. Arsenal             151.434
  5. Tottenham Hotspur   149.434
  6. Borussia Dortmund   141.090
  7. Manchester City     140.434
  8. Real Madrid         134.799
  9. Paris St. Germain   128.317
 10. Juventus            127.976


UEFA COMPETITION FINALS 2016-18:
 
 Euro 2016: Bosnia & Herzegovina 0 - 2 Italy (France)

 Champions League 
 2016:  Dortmund 1 - 1 Real Madrid (3-4 pens) (Milan)
 2017:  Tottenham 3 - 2 Marseille (Barcelona)
 2018:  PSG 0 - 1 Chelsea (Paris)

 Europa League
 2016:  Man City 0 - 1 Arsenal (Porto)
 2017:  Arsenal 1 - 0 Chelsea (AET) (Paris)
 2018:  Arsenal 1 - 0 Inter Milan (Stockholm)

 Super Cup
 2015: Chelsea 3 - 1 Man City
 2016: Arsenal 1 - 2 Real Madrid (Arnhem)
 2017: Tottenham 3 - 2 Arsenal (Trabzon)
 2018: Arsenal v Chelsea, 31 August 2018 (St. Étienne)

 NextGen Series
 2016: Bayern Munich 2 - 1 AC Milan (AET)
 2017: Arsenal 2 - 0 Tottenham
 2018: Barcelona 1 - 1 Bursaspor

 U21 Championship
 2016: Belgium 0 - 1 Croatia (Pistoia)
 2018: Championship begins on 17 June (Ireland)

 U19 Championship
 2016: Germany 2 - 3 France (AET) (Berlin)
 2017: Netherlands 2  - 0 Greece (Athens)
 2018: Championship begins on 17 July (Poland)

RTFM is returning after a hiatus since we resigned as manager of Borussia Dortmund at the end of June 2015. The three seasons since then have been fully simulated in the original FM13 save, right up to the eve of the FIFA World Cup in Russia. Our daily news will return on 15 June 2018, with regular blog posts between now and then to highlight what’s happened in our absence.
NB: The entirety of RTFM is being played on Football Manager 2013. Regen players will have ® after their names to indicate this. Be aware that changes to competition rules since the summer of 2012 will not have been implemented in our save (e.g. UEL winners do not automatically qualify for the UCL), and this includes any new clubs or franchises, though we will endeavour to report on correct/current competition titles.
We will return to club management after our save generates the domestic leagues we’ve selected for the 2018-19 season on, or shortly after, 20th June. Feel free to ask questions in the comments or @realtimefm.

Catch-Up: T Is For… Tottenham Hotspur

Four days and four catch-up posts to go before the 2018 FIFA World Cup kicks-off in Russia, and we’re up to ‘T’ in the alphabet. There’s only one place we need to look today, and that’s towards Tottenham Hotspur. Arsenal fans may want to stop reading now…

Our last look at Spurs at the end of the 2014-15 season saw André Villas-Boas’s side pip Swansea on the final day of the Premier League season to finish 4th before a last-gasp extra-time defeat by Chelsea in the Champions League Final in Istanbul.

2015-16

It was a busy summer for Spurs, with seven players joining the club for a total of £35m, with the club raising a similar amount in sales with eighteen other players leaving on loan deals and free transfers.

Ezequiel Cirigliano (Swansea, £16.5m) and Diego Rubio (Sporting, £12.5m) were the largest outlays, while Olivier Giroud joined from Bayern Munich in a straight swap for Magnus Wolff Eikrem. Leandro Damião would join on a free from Internacional at the end of the window.

FC Lorient were beaten 3-1 on aggregate to put Spurs into the Champions League Group Stage where they’d be drawn alongside Ajax, Rapid Vienna, and Inter Milan. 0-1 defeats at Inter, and at Wigan in the league, were the only blemishes on the calendar through to the end of October before a shootout loss at home to Brighton in the Carabao Cup.

A 2-3 defeat at Stoke proved to be Villas-Boas’s last game at Spurs, despite the club firmly top of the table. When Claudio Ranieri was sacked at Bayern Munich, the German club swooped for him. Slaven Bilic was appointed from Valencia to replace AVB. Spurs would win the first seven on the spin under Bilic, and go unbeaten in fifteen up to a shock 0-3 defeat at Swansea in early January 2016.

A run of thirteen consecutive wins would follow as the club would win their way through to the Champions League Quarter-Finals where they’d go out to Barcelona, and through to the FA Cup Final after beating Arsenal in the Semi.

Wolves would shock Spurs at Wembley with a 2-0 win but Spurs had the title sewn up at the end of March with a commanding lead at the top of the Premier League, that would be stretched to a whopping 23 points over eventual runners-up Manchester United. White Hart Lane hosted its final match as Spurs beat Norwich 3-1 on the final day.

2016-17

After a 2-1 Community Shield win over Wolves, Tottenham would move into their new stadium at Perryman Park with £50m of new arrivals in the squad. Davide Santon (Newcastle, £15m), Granit Xhaka (Gladbach, £16.5m) and Viktor Fischer (Dortmund, £13m) were the big names to join.

Ezequiel Cirigliano would leave after one season as he went to join the man who brought him to Spurs at Bayern Munich, with Tottenham also raising £12m with the sale of  Gylfi Sigurðsson to Manchester United.

In a quirk of fixture fate, Norwich City – the club who helped Tottenham wave farewell to White Hart Lane – would be the first visitors to new stadium Perryman Park, and a brace from Leandro Damião would see Spurs start their campaign with a 2-0 win. Juventus, Gladbach and Rapid Vienna (again) were drawn in the Champions League and it was the German side who fell upon the Spurs sword first as Tottenham ran out 6-0 winners away from home in their opening group match.

By the end of the year, Spurs were level with Chelsea and Man City in a three-way title tussle and comfortably through to the Champions League Knockout Rounds dropping just two points in their group (a 1-1 draw at Juventus). Spurs somewhat laboured through to the FA Cup 5th Round with wins over Everton and Blackpool before losing in a replay at home to Bolton.

Valencia were beaten in Europe, setting-up a Quarter-Final against Juventus. A Giroud hat-trick would help seal a 3-2 win in Turin, before a 1-1 draw back in London put them through to the Semi-Finals against Manchester United. Emmanuel Adebayor would cancel out Rodrigo’s early goal for United in the First Leg, before the return game at Old Trafford.

Adebayor opened the scoring before Rodrigo’s equaliser, and it was the Spanish striker who would put United in front on aggregate shortly after half-time. Tottenham had 42 minutes to score the one they needed to progress on away goals, but it wasn’t coming as United’s defence were holding firm in control of the game.

With one last gasp, Tom Huddlestone sent one long for Adebayor. A bad first touch took the ball away from him but Chris Smalling nor Phil Jones came to deal with it. One on one with David De Gea in stoppage time, it was now or never… and it was now. Adebayor slotted home for 3-3 on aggregate and Spurs were through to the Final against Marseille.

Domestically, Spurs would beat Chelsea at home but defeats at Fulham and Arsenal would put Chelsea four clear at the top. A home draw against WBA sent the title Chelsea’s way, while Spurs signed off their league campaign with a win over Man City to finish 2nd.

In Barcelona for the Champions League Final, Leandro Damião and Adebayor had Spurs 2-0 up by the 34th minute but Marseille got themselves back in the game shortly before half-time through Morgan Amalfitano. Adebayor made it 3-1 just three minutes after the interval, and while Marseille pulled another back with a Brown Ideye goal, Spurs went on to lift their first Champions League trophy.

2017-18

As European champions, Spurs could spend big to bring in a marquee signing and they spent £45m on 20-year old Real Madrid striker Iñigo®. Almost £30m was raised with the sales of Steven Caulker (Liverpool, £11m), Sime Vrsaljko (PG, £12m), and Diego Rubio (Corinthians, £7m).

Europa League winners Arsenal were beaten 3-2 in the UEFA SuperCup in Turkey as Spurs came from behind to win courtesy of a late Antonio Valencia strike.

By the end of November, Spurs had only suffered defeat three times: home to Chelsea in the Carabo Cup, home to Aston Villa (league), and at PSG en route to winning their Champions League group that also included Bayern Leverkusen and Polish side Strask Wroclaw.

Tottenham were hot favourites to become the first English side to win the FIFA Club World Cup since Man United in 2008. Qatari side Al-Sadd were beaten 4-0 in Doha with a Gareth Bale hat-trick and a strike from Iñigo, but São Paulo would win the Final in extra-time with Hugo Lloris’s unfortunate error the only goal of the game.

Back home, the club went back top of the table as they caught up their games in hand and Ipswich were brushed aside in the FA Cup before a 4th Round defeat at home to Leicester interrupted a run of ten unbeaten.

AC Milan were beaten 3-0 at home for a 4-1 aggregate victory, before a 2-2 draw at Barcelona in the Champions League Quarter-Finals. Unfortunately Spurs couldn’t become the first holders to retain the UCL title as Barça won 3-2 at Perryman Park to progress.

Spurs won three of their final five in the league, and a thumping 5-0 win at Stamford Bridge ended Chelsea’s title hopes as revenge for the previous season. Despite a 0-3 loss at Wigan, Tottenham would win the title by 5 points from Chelsea, with Man United and Man City 10 and 15 points behind respectively.

A pair of free transfers are set to go through on 01 July: Olivier Giroud will join Marseille, while Angel Di María will join from Real Madrid. Slaven Bilic remains in charge, with Younes Kaboul club captain.


RTFM is returning after a hiatus since we resigned as manager of Borussia Dortmund at the end of June 2015. The three seasons since then have been fully simulated in the original FM13 save, right up to the eve of the FIFA World Cup in Russia. Our daily news will return on 15 June 2018, with regular blog posts between now and then to highlight what’s happened in our absence.
NB: The entirety of RTFM is being played on Football Manager 2013. Regen players will have ® after their names to indicate this. Be aware that changes to competition rules since the summer of 2012 will not have been implemented in our save (e.g. UEL winners do not automatically qualify for the UCL), and this includes any new clubs or franchises, though we will endeavour to report on correct/current competition titles.
We will return to club management after our save generates the domestic leagues we’ve selected for the 2018-19 season on, or shortly after, 20th June. Feel free to ask questions in the comments or @realtimefm.

Catch-Up: C Is For… Cardiff, Chelsea, CL

Time for part three of our catch-up of the last three seasons, and we’re up to C. We’ll continue our look at the teams that have graced the Premier League during our hiatus, as well as looking at Europe’s premier club competition – the UEFA Champions League.

Cardiff City were part of our last look at the Championship back in 2015, when they lost in the Playoff Final to Blackpool following their 5th place finish. Failure to get promoted took a heavy toll on the side as they slumped to an 18th-place finish the following season, which cost Stuart McCall his job.

Former-Arsenal legend John Jensen was recruited following his success with Bournemouth where he won the EFL Trophy. He guided Cardiff to the last-sixteen of the FA Cup as well as a top three finish, where they beat Blackpool and Blackburn in the Playoffs to book their place back in the top-flight since 1962.

As the club prepared for the their first-ever Premier League season, the hot favourites for relegation spent only £450k on Marcos Alonso from Bolton in the summer transfer window. Predictably Cardiff finished rock-bottom, nine points adrift. A sixteen-match run from New Years Day 2018 which saw just one win and one draw summed-up their lacklustre challenge for survival, which saw Jensen fired.

New manager Simon Grayson’s first summer signing has been Slovenian striker Maks Barisic from FC Koper for £1.4m ahead of their season back in the second-tier.

In 2015 Chelsea finished 3rd as the title went to the final day between the two Manchester clubs, but they sealed their second Champions League trophy in four seasons with a 2-1 win over Spurs in Istanbul under the guidance of Luciano Spalletti.

He brought in Kyriakos Papadopoulos  (Schalke), Abel Hernández (Palermo), Miralem Pjanic (Roma), and James Milner (Man City) for a combined £52m in the summer. Daniel Sturridge (Liverpool, £6m) and Juan Cuadrado (Marseille, £8.5m) the main exports.

Come August, they came from behind to beat Europa League winners Manchester City 3-1 in the UEFA Super Cup in Tbilisi. Heading to South Korea in December 2015, Chelsea beat Atlante and Fluminense to lift the FIFA World Club Cup for the first time. Success also came in the Carabao Cup though, with a 4-2 win over Wigan at Wembley taking the first domestic silverware of the season.

A wobble in April which saw the club collect just two points from five matches meant they missed out on Champions League football by a single point to Liverpool on the final day of the season when an 88th minute equaliser from Stoke midfielder Lee Keun-Ho denied Chelsea all three points. Their European campaign only took them as far as the last sixteen in the UCL, with Benfica scoring a crucial away goal at Stamford Bridge to eliminate the holders.

Ricardo Rodríguez (Wolfsburg) and Stephan El Shaarawy (AC Milan) arrived for a little over £30m between them, but it was the free capture of Alexis Sánchez from Barcelona that raised eyebrows the most. Hatem Ben Arfa moved to Man United for £20m, days before Kevin De Bruyne followed him up the M6 to join Man City in a £13m deal.

Despite progressing from their Europa League group behind Roma in the 2016-17 season, Spalletti lost his job at Stamford Bridge at the end of a seven-match run which saw Chelsea win just twice, take one point from six against Roma, and lose to Burnley.

Fatih Terim joined from Hamburg as his replacement and his arrival saw Chelsea go on a stunning run: winning his first four matches in charge, and going unbeaten for 20 (17 wins, 3 draws) until a 2-3 home defeat by Norwich in the FA Cup 5th Round. However, they lost just three of their next eighteen on a run that took them to the Premier League title and the Europa League Final. An extra-time goal from Jack Wilshere won it for the Gunners in Paris.

Last summer, Aaron Ramsey and Micah Richards joined from Arsenal in a £30m+ double-deal, with half of that money coming from the sale of Romelu Lukaku to Barcelona. Sebastian Coates later arrived from Bayern Munich for £6.5m.

2017-18 saw the season start with a 2-0 Community Shield win over Norwich. An opening matchday defeat by Marseille was their only slip-up in the Champions League Group Stage as they won their group comfortably. Domestically they reached the Carabao Cup Quarters, losing at home to Arsenal, before defeat at Old Trafford in the FA Cup.

Come February, Chelsea were sat atop the Premier League but defeats to Stoke, Sunderland and Aston Villa in March saw them overtaken by Tottenham. Porto and Atletico Madrid came and went in the Champions League, before Chelsea won both legs of their Semi-Final against Valencia 1-0 to set-up a showdown against PSG in Paris.

In what was billed as a title-decided, Spurs rocked up at Stamford Bridge at the end of April and promptly the hosts away as Chelsea imploded in the first-half, being reduced to nine men following the dismissals of André Aye and Ramires, with Tottenham four-up at the break. A last-minute Inigo goal for the visitors wrapped-up a 5-0 win and the title.

All eyes then focused on the Stade de France as PSG made the short-trip across Paris for the UEFA Champions League Final, Chelsea’s fourth in eleven years. A 70th-minute Eden Hazard goal was all that was needed against the ten-man French champions as Chelsea collected their fifth European trophy in seven seasons.

Our last look at the UEFA Champions League in 2015 saw Chelsea beat Spurs in the final in Istanbul. After Gray Surman’s resignation from Dortmund in 2015, many thought it would take the club a couple of seasons to bounce-back to continental success, but they came very close at first-time of asking by reaching the 2016 Final.

Real Madrid stood in their way in the San Siro, and Antonio Conte’s side battled to take the game to extra-time against Roberto Mancini’s dominant Spanish champions. Cristiano Ronaldo put Real ahead in the 96th minute only for Dortmund to equalise straight from the restart as André Schürrle swept home a cross. 1-1 at the final whistle, it was Real who triumphed from the spot for La Decima.

The two sides met again in the 2017 knockout phases with Real winning 5-3 on aggregate, but Real stumbled in the Quarter-Final against Manchester United which saw the English side join Tottenham, Barcelona, and Marseille in the final four. Spurs’ vital away goal at Old Trafford put them into the Final where they’d face a Marseille side who beat Barça 3-1 in France.

A brace from Emmanual Adebayor and a Leandro Damião goal saw Spurs lift the trophy for the first time in their history (and first continental trophy since 1984), despite Marseille coming from two-down to equalise in the second-half. Spurs would later beat Arsenal in the UEFA Super Cup, and lose in the FIFA World Club Cup Final to São Paulo.

Last season’s Champions League saw both Manchester clubs, Juventus, and AC Milan all stumble at the first knockout phase, with PSG, Valencia, Barcelona and Chelsea making up the final four. As you’ve read above, it was Chelsea who triumphed in Paris against PSG to become the third English winner in four years.


RTFM is returning after a hiatus since we resigned as manager of Borussia Dortmund at the end of June 2015. The three seasons since then have been fully simulated in the original FM13 save, right up to the eve of the FIFA World Cup in Russia. Our daily news will return on 15 June 2018, with regular blog posts between now and then to highlight what’s happened in our absence.
NB: The entirety of RTFM is being played on Football Manager 2013. Regen players will have ® after their names to indicate this. Be aware that changes to competition rules since the summer of 2012 will not have been implemented in our save (e.g. UEL winners do not automatically qualify for the UCL), and this includes any new clubs or franchises, though we will endeavour to report on correct/current competition titles.
We will return to club management after our save generates the domestic leagues we’ve selected for the 2018-19 season on, or shortly after, 20th June. Feel free to ask questions in the comments or @realtimefm.